May 29, 2020
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uranusssThe Place of Uranus in the Solar System

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun. It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Though it is visible to the naked eye like the five classical planets, it was never recognized as a planet by ancient observers because of its dimness and slow orbit.  The earliest recorded sighting was in 1690 when John Flamsteed observed it at least six times, cataloging it as 34 Tauri. The French astronomer Pierre Lemonnier observed Uranus at least twelve times between 1750 and 1769, including on four consecutive nights. So, even though it is visible to the naked eye like the five classical planets, it was never recognized as a planet by early observers because of its dimness and slow orbit.  It was Sir William Herschel that first announced its discovery on March 13, 1781, expanding the known boundaries of the Solar System for the first time in history. Uranus was also the first planet discovered with a telescope.Sir William Herschel announced its discovery on March 13, 1781, expanding the known boundaries of the Solar System for the first time in history. Uranus was also the first planet discovered with a telescope. Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both are of different chemical composition than the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. For this reason, astronomers sometimes place them in a separate category called “ice giants”. Uranus’s atmosphere, although similar to Jupiter’s and Saturn’s in its primary composition of hydrogen and helium, contains more “ices” such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of hydrocarbons. At ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, Uranus’s atmosphere is remarkably bland in comparison to the other giant planets, even to Neptune, which it otherwise closely resembles. When Voyager 2 flew by Uranus in 1986, it observed a total of ten cloud features across the entire planet. [2] One proposed explanation for this dearth of features is that Uranus’s internal heat appears markedly lower than that of the other giant planets.  It is the coldest planetary atmosphere in the Solar System, with a minimum temperature of 49 K (−224.2 °C), and has a complex, layered cloud structure, with water thought to make up the lowest clouds, and methane the uppermost layer of clouds. In contrast, the interior of Uranus is mainly composed of ices and rock. [3] Curiously, Uranus is the only planet whose name is derived from a figure from Greek mythology rather than Roman mythology like the other planets, from the Latinized version of the Greek god of the sky, Ouranos.  The Uranian system has a unique configuration among those of the planets because its axis of rotation is tilted sideways, nearly into the plane of its revolution about the Sun. Its north and south poles therefore lie where most other planets have their equators. [4] In 1986, images from Voyager 2 showed Uranus as a virtually featureless planet in visible light without the cloud bands or storms associated with the other giants. Terrestrial observers have seen signs of seasonal change and increased weather activity in recent years as Uranus approached its equinox. The wind speeds on Uranus can reach 250 meters per second (900 km/h, 560 mph). [5] Uranus has 27 known natural satellites. [6] The names for these satellites are chosen from characters in the works of Shakespeare and Alexander Pope.  [7]  The five main satellites are Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania and Oberon. [8] Like the other giant planets, Uranus has a ring system, a magnetosphere, and numerous moons. The Uranian satellite system is the least massive among those of the giant planets. The rings are composed of extremely dark particles, which vary in size from micrometers to a fraction of a meter. [9] Thirteen distinct rings are presently known, the brightest being the ε ring. All except two rings of Uranus are extremely narrow – they are usually a few kilometres wide. The rings are probably quite young; the dynamics considerations indicate that they did not form with Uranus. The matter in the rings may once have been part of a moon (or moons) that was shattered by high-speed impacts.

The Place or Uranus in Astrology and Planetary Magick

Uranus is named after the ancient Greek deity of the sky Uranus (Ancient Greek: Οὐρανός), the father of Cronus (Saturn) and grandfather of Zeus (Jupiter), which in Latin became “Ūranus”. It is the only planet whose name is derived from a figure from Greek mythology rather than Roman mythology. The adjective of Uranus is “Uranian”.  Uranus has two astronomical symbols. The first to be proposed, ♅, was suggested by Lalande in 1784. In a letter to Herschel, Lalande described it as “un globe surmonté par la première lettre de votre nom” (“a globe surmounted by the first letter of your surname”). [10] A later proposal,  is a hybrid of the symbols for Mars and the Sun because Uranus was the Sky in Greek mythology, which was thought to be dominated by the combined powers of the Sun and Mars. The sigil of Uranus that is used by modern astrologist and occultist is a circle surmounted by an equal-armed cross, with two crescents facing outwards, one on each of the ends of the horizontal line of the cross.  Planetary magicians amd astrologers explains this sigil in the folowing manner: “The elemental balance of the the cross is radiated outwards as change (the two crescents) and dominates spirit (circle), indicating the manifestation and radiation of ideas into reality, which fits with the revolutionary nature of Uranus.” [10a]  In the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese languages, its name is literally translated as the “sky king star” (天王星). [11] The chemical element uranium, discovered in 1789 by the German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth, was named after the newly discovered planet Uranus. [12] “Uranus, the Magician” is a movement in Gustav Holst’s The Planets, written between 1914 and 1916.  Having being discovered late in history, Uranus in not used very muck in planetary magick.  The magical image of Uranus is “a strong but elderly bearded man.” [13] There are not much details available about his magical image because “he is the less anthropomorphized of the gods.” [14]

For some modern Western astrologers, the planet Uranus (Uranus's astrological symbol.svg) is the ruling planet of Aquarius and is exalted in Scorpio. In Greek mythology, Uranus is the personification of the heavens and the night sky. The planet Uranus is very unusual among the planets in that it rotates on its side, so that it presents each of its poles to the Sun in turn during its orbit; causing both hemispheres to alternate between being bathed in light and lying in total darkness over the course of the orbit. Uranus takes 84 years to orbit the Sun, spending about 7 years in each sign of the zodiac. Uranus was discovered only in 1781 by Sir William Herschel. Astrologically modern interpretations associate Uranus with the principles of genius, individuality, new and unconventional ideas, discoveries, electricity, inventions, and the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Uranus, among all planets, most governs genius. Uranus governs societies, clubs, and any group dedicated to humanitarian or progressive ideals. Uranus, the planet of sudden and unexpected changes, rules freedom and originality. In society, it rules radical ideas and people, as well as revolutionary events that upset established structures. In art and literature, the discovery of Uranus coincided with the Romantic movement, which emphasized individuality and freedom of expression. In medicine, Uranus is believed to be particularly associated with the sympathetic nervous system, mental disorders, breakdowns and hysteria, spasms, and cramps. Uranus is considered by modern astrologers to be ruler of the eleventh house.

Tree of Life Attribution

The astrological correspondence for Chokmah is Uranus – although, Israel Regardie warns us, ” traditionally the sphere of the zodiac is allocated thereto.” [1]

—————-

[1]  Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 42.
[2] Smith, B. A.; Soderblom, L. A.; Beebe, A.; Bliss, D.; Boyce, J. M.; Brahic, A.; Briggs, G. A.; Brown, R. H.; Collins, S. A. (4 July 1986). “Voyager 2 in the Uranian System: Imaging Science Results”. Science 233 (4759): 43–64
[3] Podolak, M.; Weizman, A.; Marley, M. (December 1995). “Comparative models of Uranus and Neptune”. Planetary and Space Science 43 (12): 1517–1522.
[4] Smith, B. A.; Soderblom, L. A.; Beebe, A.; Bliss, D.; Boyce, J. M.; Brahic, A.; Briggs, G. A.; Brown, R. H.; Collins, S. A. (4 July 1986). “Voyager 2 in the Uranian System: Imaging Science Results”. Science 233 (4759): 43–64.
[5] Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M. (December 2005). “Dynamics of cloud features on Uranus”. Icarus 179 (2): 459–484.
[6] Sheppard, S. S.; Jewitt, D.; Kleyna, J. (2005). “An Ultradeep Survey for Irregular Satellites of Uranus: Limits to Completeness”. The Astronomical Journal 129: 518.
[7] Faure, Gunter; Mensing, Teresa (2007). Uranus: What Happened Here?. In Faure, Gunter; Mensing, Teresa M. “Introduction to Planetary Science”. Introduction to Planetary Science. Springer Netherlands. p. 369.
[8] Faure, Gunter; Mensing, Teresa (2007). Uranus: What Happened Here?. In Faure, Gunter; Mensing, Teresa M. “Introduction to Planetary Science”. Introduction to Planetary Science. Springer Netherlands. p. 369.
[9] Smith, B. A.; Soderblom, L. A.; Beebe, A.; Bliss, D.; Boyce, J. M.; Brahic, A.; Briggs, G. A.; Brown, R. H.; Collins, S. A. (4 July 1986). “Voyager 2 in the Uranian System: Imaging Science Results”. Science 233 (4759): 43–64.
[10] Herschel, Francisca (1917). “The meaning of the symbol H+o for the planet Uranus“. The Observatory (The Observatory) 40: 306.
[10a] David Rankine & Sortia D’Este, Practical Planetary Magick, p. 167.
[11] ChinaDe Groot, Jan Jakob Maria (1912). “Religion in China: universism. a key to the study of Taoism and Confucianism”American lectures on the history of religions 10 (G. P. Putnam’s Sons). p. 300.
[12] “Uranium”The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (4th ed.). Houghton Mifflin Company.
[13] David Rankine & Sortia D’Este, Practical Planetary Magick, p. 166.
[14] David Rankine & Sortia D’Este, Practical Planetary Magick, p. 166.

n the antiquity, no celestial attributions were given to this path, but in modern times the planet Uranus is frequently used.    Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun. It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both are of different chemical composition than the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. For this reason, astronomers sometimes place them in a separate category called “ice giants“. Uranus’s atmosphere, although similar to Jupiter’s and Saturn’s in its primary composition of hydrogenand helium, contains more “ices” such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of hydrocarbons.[12] It is the coldest planetary atmosphere in the Solar System, with a minimum temperature of 49 K (−224.2 °C), and has a complex, layered cloudstructure, with water thought to make up the lowest clouds, and methane the uppermost layer of clouds.[12] In contrast, the interior of Uranus is mainly composed of ices and rock.[11]

It is the only planet whose name is derived from a figure from Greek mythologyrather than Roman mythology like the other planets, from the Latinized version of the Greek god of the sky, Ouranos. Like the other giant planets, Uranus has a ring system, a magnetosphere, and numerous moons. The Uranian system has a unique configuration among those of the planets because its axis of rotation is tilted sideways, nearly into the plane of its revolution about the Sun. Its north and south poles therefore lie where most other planets have their equators.[16] In 1986, images from Voyager 2 showed Uranus as a virtually featureless planet in visible light without the cloud bands or storms associated with the other giants.[16] Terrestrial observers have seen signs of seasonal change and increased weather activity in recent years as Uranus approached its equinox. The wind speeds on Uranus can reach 250 meters per second (900 km/h, 560 mph).[17]

Though it is visible to the naked eye like the five classical planets, it was never recognized as a planet by ancient observers because of its dimness and slow orbit.[18]Sir William Herschel announced its discovery on March 13, 1781, expanding the known boundaries of the Solar System for the first time in history. Uranus was also the first planet discovered with a telescope.

For some modern Western astrologers, the planet Uranus (Uranus's astrological symbol.svg) is the ruling planet of Aquarius and is exalted in Scorpio. In Greek mythology, Uranus is the personification of the heavens and the night sky. The planet Uranus is very unusual among the planets in that it rotates on its side, so that it presents each of its poles to the Sun in turn during its orbit; causing both hemispheres to alternate between being bathed in light and lying in total darkness over the course of the orbit.

Uranus takes 84 years to orbit the Sun, spending about 7 years in each sign of the zodiac. Uranus was discovered only in 1781 by Sir William Herschel.

Astrologically modern interpretations associate Uranus with the principles of genius, individuality, new and unconventional ideas, discoveries, electricity, inventions, and the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Uranus, among all planets, most governs genius.

Uranus governs societies, clubs, and any group dedicated to humanitarian or progressive ideals. Uranus, the planet of sudden and unexpected changes, rules freedom and originality. In society, it rules radical ideas and people, as well as revolutionary events that upset established structures.

In art and literature, the discovery of Uranus coincided with the Romantic movement, which emphasized individuality and freedom of expression. In medicine, Uranus is believed to be particularly associated with the sympathetic nervous system, mental disorders, breakdowns and hysteria, spasms, and cramps. Uranus is considered by modern astrologers to be ruler of the eleventh house.[citation needed]

In astrology, the planet Uranus (Uranus's astrological symbol.svg) is the ruling planet of Aquarius. Because Uranus is colored cyan and Uranus is associated with electricity, the color electric blue, a color close to cyan, is associated with the sign Aquarius[128] (see Uranus in astrology).

The chemical element uranium, discovered in 1789 by the German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth, was named after the newly discovered planet Uranus.[129]

“Uranus, the Magician” is a movement in Gustav Holst‘s The Planets, written between 1914 and 1916.

Operation Uranus was the successful military operation in World War II by the Soviet army to take back Stalingrad and marked the turning point in the land war against the Wehrmacht.

The lines “Then felt I like some watcher of the skies/When a new planet swims into his ken”, from John Keats‘s “”On First Looking Into Chapman’s Homer“, are a reference to Herschel’s discovery of Uranus.[130]

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