December 13, 2019
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Review Category : Plant Symbolism

Almond in Flower

The Place of Almond in the Vegetal World The almond (Prunus dulcis, syn. Prunus amygdalus, Amygdalus communis, Amygdalus dulcis) is a species of tree native to the Middle East and South Asia. “Almond” is also the name of the edible and widely cultivated seed of this tree. The word “almond” comes from Old French almande or alemande, Late Latin *amandula, derived through a form amygdala from the Greek ἀμυγδαλή (amygdalē) (cf. amygdala), an almond. Other related names of ...

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Amaranth

The Place of Amaranth in the Vegetal Kingdom Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth, is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. They have catkin (cylindrical flower cluster) -like cymes of densely packed flowers that grows in summer or autumn. [3] Approximately 60 species are recognized, with inflorescences and foliage ranging from purple and red to green or gold. Members of this genus share many characteristics and uses with members ...

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Lilly

   Lilium (members of which are true lilies) is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants growing from bulbs, all with large prominent flowers. Lilies are a group of flowering plants which are important in culture and literature in much of the world. Most species are native to the temperate northern hemisphere, though their range extends into the northern subtropics. Many other plants have “lily” in their common name but are not related to true lilies.  ...

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Opium Poppy

Papaver somniferum, commonly known as the opium poppy,[2] or breadseed poppy,[3] is a species of flowering plant in the family Papaveraceae. It is the species of plant from which opium and poppy seeds are derived and is a valuable ornamental plant, grown in gardens. Its native range is probably the eastern Mediterranean, but is now obscured by ancient introductions and cultivation. This poppy is grown as an agricultural crop on a large scale, for one of three primary purposes. The first is ...

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Cedar

Cedrus (common English name cedar) is a genus of coniferous trees in the plant family Pinaceae (subfamily Abietoideae). They are native to the mountains of the western Himalayasand the Mediterranean region, occurring at altitudes of 1,500–3,200 m in the Himalayas and 1,000–2,200 m in the Mediterranean.[1]  Both the Latin word cedrus and the generic name cedrus are derived from Greek κέδρος kédros. Ancient Greek and Latin used the same word, kédros and cedrus, respectively, for different species of plants now classified in the genera Cedrus and Juniperus (juniper). Species of both genera are native to the area ...

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Pine

A pine is any conifer in the genus Pinus,[1] of the family Pinaceae. Pinus is the sole genus in the subfamily Pinoideae. The Plant List compiled by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden accepts 126 species names of pines as current, together with 35 unresolved species and many more synonyms.[2]   The modern English name “pine” derives from Latin pinus, which some have traced to the Indo-European base *pīt- ‘resin’ (source of English pituitary).[3] Before the 19th century, pines were often referred to as firs (from Old Norse fura, by way of Middle ...

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Shamrock 

A shamrock is a young sprig, used as a symbol of Ireland. Saint Patrick, Ireland’s patron saint, is said to have used it as a metaphor for the Christian Holy Trinity.[1] The name shamrockcomes from Irish seamróg [ˈʃamˠɾˠoːɡ], which is the diminutive of the Irish word for plant (seamair) and means simply “little plant” or “young plant”.[2]  Shamrock usually refers to either the species Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí)[3] or Trifolium repens (white clover, Irish: seamair bhán). However, other three-leavedplants—such as Medicago lupulina, Trifolium pratense, and Oxalis acetosella—are sometimes called shamrocks. The shamrock was traditionally ...

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Acacia

Acacia (/əˈkeɪʃə/ or /əˈkeɪsiə/), known commonly as acacia, thorntree, whistling thorn, or wattle, is a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae, described by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1773 based on the African species Acacia nilotica. Many non-Australian species tend to be thorny, whereas the majority of Australian acacias are not. All species are pod-bearing, with sap and leaves often bearing large amounts of tannins and condensed tannins that historically found use as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. The generic name derives from ἀκακία (akakia), the name given by ...

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 Moly

The sacred plant correspondence for Yod is moly, and its vegetable drug is anhalonium lewinii59 (Aleister Crowley, 777, p.10 and p. 13) which, according to Israel Regardie, when taken internally, “causes visions of color rings and of an intellectual nature, enhancing self-analysis.” (Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 53)   Moly (Greek: μῶλυ, [môly]) is a magical herb mentioned in book 10 of Homer’s Odyssey.[1]   In the story, Hermes gave this herb to Odysseus to protect him from Circe’s magic when ...

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Mandrake

Its plants are the mandrake and damiana,(Aleister Crowley, 777, p.10) “both of whose aphrodisiac qualities are well known.” (Regardie Israel, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p.?)  Mandrake is the common name for members of the plantgenus Mandragora, particularly the species Mandragora officinarum, belonging to the nightshadesfamily (Solanaceae). Because mandrake contains delirianthallucinogenic tropane alkaloids such as atropine, scopolamine, apoatropine, and hyoscyamine, and the roots sometimes contain bifurcations causing them to resemble human figures, their roots have long been used in magic rituals, today also in contemporary pagan traditions such as Wicca and Odinism. The ...

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