November 29, 2020
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Review Category : Roman Pantheon

Saturn

Saturn (Latin: Saturnus) is a god in ancient Roman religion, and a character in myth. Saturn is a complex figure because of his multiple associations and long history. He was the first god of the Capitol, known since the most ancient times as Saturnius Mons, and was seen as a god of generation, dissolution, plenty, wealth, agriculture, periodic renewal and liberation. In later developments he came to be also a god of time. His ...

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Cybele

Cybele (Phrygian: Matar Kubileya/Kubeleya“Kubeleyan Mother”, perhaps “MountainMother”; Lydian Kuvava; Greek: ΚυβέληKyveli, Κυβήβη Kyvivi, Κύβελις Kyvelis) was an originally Anatolian mother goddess; she has a possible precursor in the earliest neolithic at Çatalhöyük (in the Konyaregion) where the statue of a pregnant goddess seated on a lion throne was found in a granary. She is Phrygia‘s only known goddess, and was probably its state deity. Her Phrygian cult was adopted and adapted by Greek colonists of Asia Minor and spread from there to mainland Greece and its more distant western ...

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Ceres

The Roman deity attribution for this 20th path of the qabalistic Tree of Life is Ceres.[58] The word Ceres’ as a name may derive from the hypothetical Proto-Indo-European root *ker, meaning “to grow”, which is also a possible root for many English words, such as “create”, “cereal”, “grow”, “kernel”, “corn”, and “increase”. Roman etymologists thought “ceres” derived from the Latin verb gerere, “to bear, bring forth, produce”, because the goddess was linked to ...

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Diana

The Roman Deity correspondence for this 25th path of the qabalistic Tree of Life is Diana, “as the celestial archer and the goddess of the chase.”[30] In Roman mythology, Diana (lt. “heavenly” or “divine”) was the goddess of the hunt and moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. Diana (pronounced with long ‘ī’ and ‘ā’) is an adjectival ...

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Bacchus

Dionysus is a complicated and powerful deity. He is a young god, but he is primal: his element is wilderness, the world of beasts and the hunt. He “delights in the raw flesh” (ll. 136-8). The image is frightening, and it hints at the violence and savagery of which Bacchus is capable. But the Bacchae speak of his generosity as well: the abundance of nature is at his command. He ...

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Juno

Juno is an ancient goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. She is a daughter of Saturn and sister (but also the wife) of the chief god Jupiter and the mother of Mars and Vulcan. Juno also looked after the women of Rome.[50] Her Greek equivalent is Hera. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire she was called Regina (“queen”) and, together with Jupiter and ...

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Neptune

Neptune (Latin: Neptūnus) was the god of water and the sea[24] in Roman mythology and religion. He is the counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon. In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune was the brother of Jupiter and Pluto, each of them presiding over one of the three realms of the universe, Heaven, Earth and the Netherworld. Depictions of Neptune in Roman mosaics, especially those of North Africa, are influenced by Hellenistic ...

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Vulcan

The Roman  Deity attribution for the path of Shin is Vulcan. (Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 88)  In ancient Roman religion and myth, Vulcan (Latin: Volcānusor Vulcānus) is the god of fire[1] including the fire of volcanoes. Vulcan is often depicted with a blacksmith’s hammer.[2]The Vulcanalia was the annual festival held August 23 in his honor. His Greek counterpart is Hephaestus, the god of fire and smithery. In Etruscan religion, he is identified with Sethlans.  The origin of the name is unclear and debated. Roman tradition ...

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Pluto

The Roman God Pluto is also considered as an attribution here (Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 88)Surprisingly enough, he was also an attribution for the 11st path of the qabalistic Tree of Life, Caph.  Obviously it’s not the aspects of Pluto that are related his rulership of the underworld that interests us in this association. Israel Regardie tells us that this correspondence is nevertheless appropriate regarding one of his ...

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Jupiter

Jupiter’s Place in Roman Mythology Jupiter (Latin: Iuppiter; genitive case: Iovis) or Jove is the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder in ancient Roman religion and myth. Jupiter was the chief deity of Roman state religion throughout the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion of the Empire. In Roman mythology, he negotiates with Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, to ...

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