April 15, 2021
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“Will you bring freedom to their souls, restore to them the meaning of the Life they have lost? Let every man and woman learn to see life as a sacred trust, a well-designed machine for a particular purpose independent of all praise and blame, one whose fulfilment is the only, as the most admirable, reward, with abundance of joy. “(Crowley, Aleister, A Letter to Henry Ford, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 191).

“For the mode whereby this noble revolution may be brought to pass? The details I must leave to your experience your genius. But the main plan is evident enough. We must apply our modern science to the problem. We need first of all to summon a council of the acutest minds of the world, of biologists, historians, psychologists, economist… They must devise a scheme for measuring a man, for penetrating his inmost nature no less than for estimating the effect of his environment. They must be able to help him to discover the work for which he is really best fitted, the work which will satisfy his spiritual as well as material needs. The must be able to advise him how to develop his powers in this direction, how to discipline himself and to steel himself against hostile forces so as to defend himself against hostile forces so as to defend his Will from internal and external hindrances. They must train experts to be able to judge men rapidly and surely, so as to assign them their place in the social organization. They must help every man to discover himself that insatiable Spirit, independent of Space, Time and the prejudices of other men, which is the mark of genius; so that his purpose is a deathless flame to consume in him all perishable ambitions. They must show him that true freedom which neither tolerates the domination of alien ideals, nor seeks to impose the arbitrary predilections of the individual upon the community. “(Crowley, Aleister, A Letter to Henry Ford, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 191).

“Little by little, as they acquire experience, they will be able to establish experimental districts where the Law Do what thou wilt shall be the sole and sufficient guarantee of the righteousness and prosperity-spiritual, moral and physical of the inhabitants. The success of such experiment will create a worldwide demand for the establishment of the Law. “(Crowley, Aleister, A Letter to Henry Ford, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 192).

“The final form of the work will be a system of Education in which each child will receive the individual attention necessary to the full development of its peculiar genius, instead of consisting, as now, of an attempt to crush out every spark of personality, and to produce a standardized product on a pattern as impossible as it is ultimately undesirable. But it is useless to adumbrate even the outlines of a plan so fertile in amazing possibilities. I have written enough-in my enthusiasm, perhaps too much-to show alike the desperate need of taking resolutely in hand the sickness of society, and the superb prospects of achievement latent in studying and applying the law Do what thou wilt. Will you be the man to give true freedom to every spirit that breathes, to create in every human heart the heaven of its inmost Will. And to declare to every mind the one way to attain it? “(Crowley, Aleister, A Letter to Henry Ford, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 191).

“Each child must develop its own Individuality, and Will, disregarding alien Ideals.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 126).

“At Cefalù’s Abbey of Thelema its resources and originality are matched against diverse environments. It is confronted with such problems as swimming, climbing, housework, and left to solve them in its own way. Its subconsciousness is impressed by reading literary masterpieces, which are left to infiltrate its mind automatically without selective stress or asking conscious comprehension. Nothing is taught except How to think for oneself. It is treated as a responsible and independent being, encouraged in self-reliance, and respected for self-assertion. .” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 126).

“Education is assisting a soul to express itself. Every child should be presented with all possible problems and allowed to register its own reactions; it should be made to face all contingencies in turn until it overcomes each successfully. Its mind must not be influenced, but only offered all kinds of nourishment. Its innate qualities will enable it to select the food proper to its nature. Respect its individuality! Submit all life for its inspection, without comment. Truth teaches us understanding, freedom develops will, experience confers resourcefulness, independence inspires self-confidence. Thereby success becomes certain.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 126).

“Every child is God of its own universe. Education develops control thereof. It must be taught nothing except how to govern its environment. Truth is the first condition; it must behold all facts scientifically. Courage, the second; it must grapple all facts resolutely. Organization, the third; it must integrate impression and ordinances. It must be allowed absolute authority over its reactions, but its tendency to deceive itself or evade actuality must be cauterized by insistent confrontation with the repugnant realities” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 127).

“Education fits individuals to encounter environment. From infancy children should face facts, unadulterated by explanation. Let them think and act for themselves; let their innate integrity initiate itself! Make them explore all life’s mysteries, overcome all its dangers. Falsity and fear are their only foe-men. Let them witness birth, marriage, death; let them hear poetry, philosophy, history; compel apprehension but not its articulate expression. Make them face cliffs, billows, animals, finding their own formula of conquest. Thrust Truth on them tirelessly, careful only to make its range all-comprehensive; trust them to use it.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 127).

“Let children educate themselves to be themselves. Those who train tehm to standards cripple and deform them. Alien ideals impose parasitic perversions. Every child is a Sphinx; none knoweth its secret but itself; presumeth Ignorance to initiate Isis? Let the Sphinx brood on its secrets, until its hour; one can assist only by leaving it to contemplate existence. Let it behold all things in Earth and heaven. (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 127).

“Guard its inviolability; strengthen it by successive struggles. Be it omniscient, omnipotent, perfected by its own Virtue to serve its own purpose-individual, independent, initiated-itself!” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 128).

“Procrustes-teatchers, assuming Themselves the ‘Measure of Mankind’, deform children deliberately by Ideals. Gardeners never assimilate poppies to potatoes; they nourish each plant by its own norm, towards excellence in its particular properties. Even elementary education should be adapted to individuals; each mind has its own peculiarities. Why not put boy’s bodies into plaster moulds of ‘perfection’? All pressure on plastic material is pernicious, thwarting its true tendencies, and perverting its proportions. Monstrous growths compensate constrictions. Education must accustom the mind to meet all eventualities, interpreting, judging, and reacting as its individual necessity demands.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 128).

“Most people mislead children purposely, alleging necessity to shield them. One falsehood confuses correct conceptions; the brain, bewildered, soon finds conflicting evidence. The contradiction between observed facts and teaching revolt its righteousness. Children distrust the Universe; intelligence revolts; years of aching uncertainty avenge the original deception. Children are also trained to falsify, sophisticate, deny or forget facts; forbidden to face them. Wielding wrong weapons, they encounter unknown or misguided enemies. Nature turns traitor; they distrust themselves; like Gilbert billiard sharper, they play ‘on a cloth untrue with a twisted cue and elliptical billiard ball. ” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 128).

“At Cefalù’s Abbey of Thelema children are as adult. Realities are their right; they observe dispassionately, and act responsibly. They are made to extricate themselves from graduated emergencies. They drill, swim, climb, play games, explore town or country alone; they listen to time tested words. They use their minds accordingly never in forced forms. They learn truth-seeing, courage, courtesy and independence; to mind their own business, respecting the rights of others, while resenting interference. Apprehending actualities accurately and acting adequately thereon, instead of crying, clinging, cringing, and ‘making believe’, they master self and surroundings.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 128-129).

“Young brains store sense-impressions without necessarily judging them. Higher mental faculties develop gradually. It is criminal to force growth, especially in dogmatic directions. Reflection, classification, coordination are devices of the growing mind for dealing with accumulations of detail. Education should simply furnish facts, intelligible or not, of every order. Avoid comment, explanation, moral judgment; the child-mind must manage its material. Truth must be taught as the condition of right relation, courage as that of right reaction. The individual equal to his environment, evolves in perfection. Children so educated are absolutely themselves, adjusted to apprehend and act by autonomous evolution.” (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 129).

“Evolution demands exceptional individuals, fitter to their environment than their fellows. Species prosper bu imitating efficient eccentrics. Mediocrity, self-styled morality, protects the unfit, but prevents progress, discourages adaptability, and assures ultimate ruin to the race. Standards of education, ideals of Right-and-Wrong, conventions, creeds, codes, stagnates Mankind. Encourage original individuals. Beware of squaring the Keystone, or heaving it over among the rubbish! Mediocrity wanted Keats druggist, Gaugin banker, Clive clerk, Mohammed camel-man! (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 129).
”Nature needs nobility. Vitality vindicates variety. Preeminence purchases progress. Superiority safeguards survival. Abnormality averts atrophy. Breed for Behemoth! Every child is absolute. Dare not bias it or bind! Give the seed fair play to shoot! At maturity its mind. Shall perfects its proper fruit, Self determined, self-designed! Durst thou twist that tenderness. To Thy whims or theories? Who adjured thee to assess. Marvels hidden from thine eyes? Meddler, muddler! Is thy guess. Guaranteed most wondorous wise? Let it meet and meseare things, Math itself against them, span. Safely the abyss-Earth sings: If you know and will, you can! (Crowley, Aleister, On the Education of Children, in Crowley (eds) (1998), The Revival of Magick, p. 130).

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