August 15, 2018
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blackcobraThe Jewel attribution for this 24th path of the Tree of Life is the snakestone.[99] The reson for this attribution seems to be related to the scorpion attribution and the ideas of death by poisonous injection. Snake-stones also known as (the) viper’s stone, (the) black stone, (der) schwarze Stein, (la) pierre noire, and (la) piedrita negra or serpent-stone[100] are animal bones, which are widely used and promoted as a treatment for snake bite in Africa, South America and Asia.[101] No scientific study is known which shows this remedy to be effective.There are differing accounts of how to use a black stone. In Peru, the black stone is to be applied to the site of a poisonous snakebite and tied firmly in place. It is left there for several days, during which time it supposedly draws the venom from the wound. Once the poison is all removed, the ‘stone’ loosens of its own accord and falls off. Although called a stone, it is made from animal bones. When taken from snakes, it is usually from the head but also said to be extracted from the tail.  A Nigerian study recommended “education on the need to avoid the use of popular first aid measures of doubtful benefit.” However the same doctors reported a year later that Black Stone may be beneficial. A Bolivian medical study stated that “contrary to widespread belief, no efficacy to treat envenomation may be expected of the BS” (black stone).[102] An Indian study stated that “unscientific methods like ‘black stone’ healing contribute to the delay in seeking appropriate medical care.”[103] A Nigerian study found that “… black stone appears to have beneficial effects by reducing the average antivenom requirement of patients and more studies are needed …”[104]

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[99] Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 81.
[100]J.K.A. Madaki, R.E. Obilom, B.M. Mandong (2005). “Pattern of First-Aid Measures Used by Snake-bite Patients and Clinical Outcome at Zamko Comprehensive Health Centre, Langtang, Plateau State”. Nigerian Medical Practitioner 48 (1).
[101]B. Adhisivam, S. Mahadevan (2006). “Snakebite Envenomation in India: A Rural Medical Emergency”. Indian Pediatrics 43: 553–4.
[102]Chippaux JP, Ramos-Cerrillo B, Stock RP (April 2007). “Study of the efficacy of the black stone on envenomation by snake bite in the murine model”. Toxicon 49 (5): 717–20.
[103]B. Adhisivam, S. Mahadevan (2006). “Snakebite Envenomation in India: A Rural Medical Emergency”. Indian Pediatrics 43: 553–4.
[104]JKA Madaki, RE Obilom, BM Mandong (2005). “Pattern of First-Aid Measures Used by Snake-bite Patients and Clinical Outcome at Zamko Comprehensive Health Centre, Langtang, Plateau State”. Nigerian Medical Practitioner 48 (1).

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