January 23, 2019
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archangel-michaelThe archangel of this sphere is Michael, and the Bene Elohim is the Angelic order.

Michael (“who is like God?“, Hebrewמִיכָאֵל‎ , Micha’el or Mîkhā’ēlGreekΜιχαήλMikhaḗlLatinMichaelArabicميخائيل‎, Mīkhā’īl) is an archangel in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic teachings. Roman Catholics, the Eastern OrthodoxAnglicans, and Lutheransrefer to him as “Saint Michael the Archangel” and also as “Saint Michael”. Orthodox Christians refer to him as the “Taxiarch Archangel Michael” or simply “Archangel Michael”.

Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel, once as a “great prince who stands up for the children of your people”. The idea that Michael was the advocate of the Jews became so prevalent that in spite of the rabbinical prohibition against appealing to angels as intermediaries between God and his people, Michael came to occupy a certain place in the Jewish liturgy.

In the New Testament Michael leads God’s armies against Satan‘s forces in the Book of Revelation, where during the war in heaven he defeats Satan. In the Epistle of Jude Michael is specifically referred to as “the archangel Michael”. Christian sanctuaries to Michael appeared in the 4th century, when he was first seen as a healing angel, and then over time as a protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil. By the 6th century, devotions to Archangel Michael were widespread both in the Eastern and Western Churches. Over time, teachings on Michael began to vary among Christian denominations.

Seventh-day Adventists

Seventh-day Adventists believe that Michael is another name for the Heavenly Christ, and another name for the Word-of-God (as in John 1) before he became incarnate as Jesus. “Archangel” (meaning “Chief of the Angels”) was the leadership position held by the Word-of-God as Michael while among the angels. According to Adventist theology, Michael was considered the “eternal Word”, and not a created being or created angel, and the one by whom all things were created. The Word was then born incarnate as Jesus.[63]

Seventh-day Adventists believe the name “Michael” is significant in showing who it is, just as “Immanuel” (which means “God with us”) is about who Jesus is. They believe that name “Michael” signifies “one who is God” and that as the “Archangel” or “chief or head of the angels” he led the angels and thus the statement in Revelation 12:7-9 identifies Jesus as Michael.[64]

Seventh-day Adventists believe that “Michael” is but one of the many titles applied to the Son of God, the second person of the Godhead. According to Adventists, such a view does not in any way conflict with the belief in his full deity and eternal preexistence, nor does it in the least disparage his person and work.[65] In support of the Seventh-day Adventist belief Michael is also the commander of God’s army which helped Joshua son of Nun to lead Israel in to conquering Jericho [Joshua 5:14 And he said, Nay; but as captain of the host of the LORD am I now come. And Joshua fell on his face to the earth, and did worship, and said unto him, What saith my Lord unto his servant?]

In the Seventh-day Adventist view, the statement in 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18: “For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven, with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God” identifies Jesus as Archangel, which is Michael.[66] And the Seventh-day Adventists believe that John 5:25-29 also confirms that Jesus and Michael are the same.[66]

The earlier Protestant scholars usually identified Michael with the preincarnate Christ, finding support for their view, not only in the juxtaposition of the “child” and the archangel in Revelation 12, but also in the attributes ascribed to him in Daniel [67]

Seventh-day Adventists believe there is and can only be one archangel and that one Archangel is named Michael and yet in Scripture is shown as doing what also applies to Christ even from the beginning, so is Christ preincarnate. There was a perception that Adventists were relegating Jesus to something less than divine or less than God but that is not valid since Seventh-day Adventism theology teaches and is expressly Trinitarian.[68][69]

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Latter-day Saints (also known informally as Mormons) believe that Michael is Adam, the Ancient of Days (Dan. 7), a prince, and the patriarch of the human family and that Michael assisted Jehovah (the heavenly form of Jesus Christ) in the creation of the world under the direction of God the Father and cast Satan out of heaven.[70][71][72][73]

Esoteric traditions

The French occultist, Eliphas Levi, the German philosopher Franz von Baader, and the Theosophist Louis Claude de St. Martin spoke of 1879 as the year in which Michael overcame the dragon. This is confirmed by the esoteric writer Rudolf Steiner in a lecture in Zurich on November 13, 1917, where he states: “in 1879, in November, a momentous event took place, a battle of the Powers of Darkness against the Powers of Light, ending in the image of Michael overcoming the Dragon”.[74]

Islam

The Qur’an mentions Michael together with Gabriel in the sura Al-Baqara:

Whoever is an enemy to Allah and His angels and messengers, to Gabriel and Michael,- Lo! Allah is an enemy to those who reject Faith.

—Quran, sura 2 (Al-Baqara) ayat 97-98[75]

In Sunni Islam, Michael will be sent to bring a handful of Earth, but the Earth will not want to yield a piece of itself, some of which will burn. This is articulated by Al-Tha’labi whose narrative states that God will tell Earth that some will obey him and others not.[76]

The Ahmadiyya movement believes in Michael along with other angels such as Gabriel. They are called Mala’ikah and are described as spiritual beings who obey Allah’s command.[77]

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