August 15, 2018
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aloe-vera Aloe, also Aloë, is a genus containing about 500 species of flowering succulent plants. The most common and well known of these is Aloe vera, or “true aloe”. The genus is native to Africa, and is common in South Africa’s Cape Province, the mountains of tropical Africa, and neighboring areas such as Madagascar, the Arabian Peninsula, and the islands of Africa. Aloe vera is used both internally and externally on humans, and is claimed to have some medicinal effects, which have been supported by scientific and medical research. The gel in the leaves can be made into a smooth type of cream that can heal burns such as sunburn. They can also be made into types of special soaps.  Historical use of various Aloe species by humans is well documented. Documentation of the clinical effectiveness is available, although relatively limited.[24] Of the 500+ species of Aloe, only a few were used traditionally as a herbal medicine, aloe vera again being the most commonly used version of aloe in herbal medicine. Also included are Aloe perryi (found in northeastern Africa) and Aloe ferox (found in South Africa).  Aquilaria agallocha is the source oif the tree’s fungus infected wood, which is distilled for the odoriferous oil. The fragrance of aloes is mentioned in the Bible, more specifically in the Book of Proverbs, where we find the following sentence: “I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamond.”[80] The term aloes-wood is used to signify many frangrant woods.[81] Aloes-wood (Heb. ‘ahalim), a fragrant wood, corresponds to the Aquilaria agallochum of botanists, or more specifically, as some suppose, to the costly gum or perfume that is usually extracted from the wood. These kinds of trees are found in China, Siam, and Northern India, and grow to the height sometimes of 120 feet. This species is of great rarity even in India. There is another and more common species, called by Indians aghil, whence Europeans have given it the name of Lignum aquile, or eagle-wood.

The Use of Aloes in Egypy

Aloewood was used by the Egyptians for embalming dead bodies. Nicodemus brought it (pounded aloe-wood) to embalm the body of Christ;[82] but whether this was the same as that mentioned elsewhere is uncertain. True agar wood has been known and used perhaps as long as sandalwood. Lign-aloes is also refered in the Bible, but according to modern scholars, lign aloes is a corruption of the Latin lignum aloes and is thus a type of wood rather than a resin.[83]

The Use of Aloes in Greek and Roman

The Ancient Greeks and Romans used Aloe vera to treat wounds. In the Middle Ages, the yellowish liquid found inside the leaves was favored as a purgative. Unprocessed aloe that contains aloin is generally used as a laxative, whereas processed juice does not usually contain significant aloin.  Ancient Greek botanist Dioscorides[84] refers as to agallochon as a wood imported from Arabia or India. He noted that it was odoriferous, with an astringent or a bitter taste. The traditional magical use is for protection and healing. Fungus infected trees produced the oleoresin which is then distilled under pressure. Agar oil range from pale yellow to dark amber. This very viscous liquid is sweet and rich with a woody-balsamic note and a sweetness reminiscent of sandalwood.[85]  The Greeks and Romans used aloe vera to treat wounds. In the Middle Ages, the yellowish liquid found inside the leaves was favored as a purgative. Unprocessed aloe that contains aloin is generally used as a laxative, whereas processed aloe vera juice does not usually contain significant aloin. Some species, particularly Aloe vera are used in alternative medicine and in the home first aids. Both the translucent inner pulp and the resinous yellow aloin from wounding the Aloe plant are used externally to relieve skin discomforts.

The Use of Aloes Today

As an herbal medicine, aloe vera juice is commonly used internally to relieve digestive discomfort. Some modern research suggests Aloe vera can significantly slow wound healing compared to normal protocols of treatment.[25] Other reviews of randomised and controlled clinical trials have provided no evidence that Aloe vera has a strong medicinal effect.[26] Today, aloe vera is used both internally and externally on humans. The gel found in the leaves is used for soothing minor burns, wounds, and various skin conditions like eczema and ringworm. The extracted aloe vera juice aloe vera plant is used internally to treat a variety of digestive conditions.

Some species, particularly Aloe vera, are used in alternative medicine and first aid. Both the translucent inner pulp and the resinous yellow aloin from wounding the aloe plant are used externally to relieve skin discomforts. As an herbal medicine, Aloe vera juice is commonly used internally to relieve digestive discomfort.[9][10]

Relatively few studies about possible benefits of aloe gel taken internally have been conducted. Components of Aloe have shown the possibility of inhibiting tumor growth in animal studies, but these effects have not been demonstrated clinically in humans.[11] Some studies in animal models indicate that extracts of Aloe have a significant antihyperglycemic effect, and may be useful in treating Type II diabetes, but these studies have not been confirmed in humans.[12]

According to Cancer Research UK, a potentially deadly product called T-UP is made of concentrated aloe, and promoted as a cancer cure. They say “there is currently no evidence that aloe products can help to prevent or treat cancer in humans”.[13]

 

Aloe Vera

Tree of Life Attributions

The perfume correspondence for this 25th path of the qabalistic Tree of Life is lignaloes,[76] or simply aloes.[77] The reason for this attribution according to British occultist Aleister Crowley, is that “The perfume of Lingum Aloes, intuitively suggests horsemanship in an airy racecourse… It is therefore to Sagittarius… as the path leading form Yesod to Tiphareth, that is this perfume apply…”[78] Obviously the connection explaining this perfume attribution must be understood through the sacred animal correspondence of this path, which is the horse, in order to get in touch with this peculiar fragrance that Crowley describe as intuitively evoking an equestrial ambiance. Aloes is the commonly use term for agar oil.[79]

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[38] Mann J.C., Hobbs J.B., Banthorpe D.V., & Harborne J.B. (1994). Natural Products: their Chemistry and Biological Significance. Harlow, Essex, England: Longman Scientific & Technical. pp. 309–11
[39] Quran 76:5

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[76] Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrenates, p. 82.
[77] Stephen Hoeller, The Fool’s Pilgrimage. Kabbalistic Meidtation on the Tarot, p. 53.
[78] Aleister Crowley, 777, p???
[79] Richard A. Miller, Iona Miller (1990), The Magical and Ritual Use of Perfumes, Bears & Co. p. 106.
[80] The Bible, Proverbs 7:17.
[81] The Bible, Numbers 24:6; Psalms 45:8; Proverbs 7:17; Cant 4:14.
[82] The Bible, John 19:39.
[83] Richard A. Miller, Iona Miller (1990), The Magical and Ritual Use of Perfumes, Bears & Co. p. 106.
[84]Pedanius Dioscorides (Greek: Πεδάνιος Διοσκουρίδης; circa 40—90 AD) was a Greek physician, pharmacologist and botanist, the author of De Materia Medica — a 5-volume encyclopedia about herbal medicine and related medicinal substances (a pharmacopeia), that was widely read for more than 1,500 years.
[85] Richard A. Miller, Iona Miller (1990), The Magical and Ritual Use of Perfumes, Bears & Co. p. 106.

[24]Reynolds, T (ed) Aloes: The genus Aloe. CRC Press.
[25]Schmidt JM, Greenspoon JS (1991). “Aloe vera dermal wound gel is associated with a delay in wound healing”. Obstet Gynecol 78 (1): 115–7.
[26]Richardson J, Smith JE, McIntyre M, Thomas R, Pilkington K (2005). “Aloe vera for preventing radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic literature review”. Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 17 (6): 478–84; Ernst E, Pittler MH, Stevinson C (2002). “Complementary/alternative medicine in dermatology: evidence-assessed efficacy of two diseases and two treatments”. Am J Clin Dermatol 3 (5): 341–8.

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