September 21, 2018
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A hand holding an upright Sword appears from a cloud.  The halo around the Hand indicates that this is Divine Hand.  The tip of the Sword is crowned with a gold circlet, from which hang a palm branch and an olive branch.  Six Yods floats above the hilt of the Sword. (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 219)

The Ace of Sword is the beginning of the Path of the Mind.  Since this is the Hand of God, this card reminds us to honor our intellect as a gift from God.  (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 219)

Both the Sword and the mind are powerful weapons.  The Sword shown here is double-edged, meaning that the mind brings both joy and suffering.  It is the mind that creates all of human society – philosophy, science, opera, French cooking and Superman comics. But the mind also creates interpretations of events that lock us into false and painful beliefs.  it is thus simultaneously our best friend and worst enemy.  This dual nature is further symbolized by the palm and olive branches, representing suffering and peace. (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 219)

We tend to forget that the mind creates the interpretations that we believe are real.  We accept the stories that make us feel sad as well as those that make us feel happy: once we believe the stories, we believe all the stories.  But the dual nature of the mind is ultimately a good thing; if its interpretations brought only joy, we would never seek to go beyond what the mind can experience.  We would never learn that the mind invents stories more often than it discerns truth. (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 220)

The Path of the Mind covers a great deal of terrain; however, if we are to make progress, the mind must eventually turn its attention to its own nature, using its powers of discernment to discover its own nature. (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 220)

The crown in the picture symbolizes Keter and the six Yods symbolize Tifaret; the Sword symbolizes the path from Keter to Tifaret. As we know from our journey through the Major Arcana, this is the path of The High Priestess.  This suggests that the Path of the Mind benefits from the subconscious mind, which offers insights and hunches that allow us to reach levels of understanding unattainable by the conscious mind alone. (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 220)

The card indicates decisive ability and cutting through confusion, taking a radical decision or standpoint and the ability to see through deception, and expose it. Some people see the sword Excalibur in it.

The Ace of Sword is the root of the power of Air.  The elemental nature of the Ace of Swords, like the Ace of Wands, is not clearly indicated.  However the hilt of the sword resembles the elemental sigil for Air as an upright triangle penetrated by a horizontal line.  A second Qabalistic clue is the crown which the point of the sword penetrates.  The Crown is the Hebraic name for the first Sephirah, Kether, on the Tree of Life.  By the Golden Dawn tradition, the first Sephirah is the source of the element Air (as the second is Fire and the third Water). Therefore the crown is a Qabalistic symbol for the element of Air, indicating the correct element for the suit of Swords. (Hulse, The Western Mysteries, p. 410)

The Ace of Swords is the beginning of the Path of the Mind.  Since this is the Head of God, this card reminds us to honor our intellect as a gift from God.  Both the Sword and the mind are powerful weapons.  The Sword shown here is double-edged, meaning that the mind brings both joy and suffering.  It is the mind that creates all of human society – philosophy, science, opera, French cooking and Superman comics.  But the mind also creates interpretations of events that lock us into false and painful beliefs.  It is thus simultaneously our best friend and worst enemy.  This dual nature is further symbolized by the palm and olive branches, representing suffering and peace.  We tend to forget that the mind creates the interpretations that we believe are real.  We accept the stories that make us feel sad as well as those that make us happy: once we believe the stories, we believe all the stories.  But the dual nature of the mind is ultimately a good thing; if its interpretations brought only joy, we would never seek to go beyond what the mind invent stories more often that it discerns truth.  Th Path of the Mind covers a great deal of terrain; however, if we are to make progress, the mind must eventually turn its attention to its own nature, using its powers of discernment to discover its own nature.  The crown in the picture symbolizes Keter and the six Yods symbolize Tifareth.  As we know from our journey through the Major Arcana, this is the path of The High Priestess.  This suggests that the Path of the Mind benefits from the subconscious mind, which offers insights and hunches that allow us to reach levels of understanding unattainable by the conscious mind alone.  (Amy M. Wall, The Tarot of Awakening, p. 220)

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