January 23, 2019
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The Symbolism of the Swan

The Place of the Swan in the Animal Kingdom Swans are birds of the family Anatidae within the genus Cygnus. The swans’ close relatives include the geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. The word swan is derived from Old English swan, akin to the German Schwan and Dutch zwaan and Swedish svan, in turn derived from ...

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The Symbolism of the Hawk/Eagle

The Place of the Hawk in the Animal Kingdom Hawk is a common name for some birds of prey, widely distributed and varying greatly in size. The large and widespread Accipiter genus includes goshawks, sparrowhawks, the Sharp-shinned Hawk and others. These are mainly woodland birds with long tails and high visual acuity, hunting by sudden dashes from a concealed perch. In Australia and Africa hawks include some of the species ...

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Brahma

The Place of Brahma in Hindu Mythology Brahmā (Sanskrit: ब्रह्मा; IAST: Brahmā) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation and one of the Trimūrti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. [6] According to the Brahmā Purāņa, [7] he is the father of Manu, and from Manu all human beings are descended. In the Rāmāyaņa [8] and the Mahābhārata,[9] he is often referred to as the progenitor or great grandsire of ...

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Zeus

Zeus’ Place in Greek Mythology Zeus (Ancient Greek: Ζεύς, Zeús) is the “Father of Gods and men” (πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε, patḕr andrōn te theōn te) (Hesiod, Theogony 542 and other sources.) who rules the Olympians of Mount Olympus as a father rules the family according to the ancient Greek religion.  Zeus is the Greek continuation of *Di̯ēus, the name of the Proto-Indo-European god of the daytime sky, also ...

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Jupiter

Jupiter’s Place in Roman Mythology Jupiter (Latin: Iuppiter; genitive case: Iovis) or Jove is the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder in ancient Roman religion and myth. Jupiter was the chief deity of Roman state religion throughout the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion of the Empire. In Roman mythology, he negotiates with Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, to ...

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Wotan

Wotan in the Anglo-Saxon, Germanic and Scandinavian Mythology Woden or Wodan (Old English: Ƿōden, [2] Old High German: Wôdan, [3] Old Saxon: Uuôden [4]) is a major deity of Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic polytheism. With his Norse counterpart,[4] Odin, Woden represents a development of the Proto-Germanic god *Wōdanaz. He is the namesake for the English-language day of the week Wednesday.  Though less is known about the pre-Christian religion of Anglo-Saxon ...

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Odin

The Place of Odin in Norse Pantheon and Mythology Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn, “The Furious One“) is a major god in most if not all branches of Germanic mythology especially in the Norse mythology branch of Germanic mythology, the Allfather of the gods, and the ruler of Asgard. The place we call Asgard (Old Norse: ”Ásgarðr”; “Enclosure of the Æsir”) [3] is one of the Nine Worlds [4] and ...

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Nuit

The Place of Nut in Egyptian Pantheon and Mythology Nut or Neuth (also spelled Nuit or Newet) was the goddess of the sky in the Ennead of Egyptian mythology. She was seen as a star-covered nude woman arching over the earth, [3a] or as a cow. Nut is a daughter of Shu and Tefnut. She is Geb’s wife as well as sister. She has four or five children: Osiris, Set, ...

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Amoun

The Place of Amoun in Egyptian Mythology Amun (also Amon, Amen, Greek Ἄμμων Ámmōn, Ἅμμων Hámmōn) was a local deity of Thebes. He was attested since the Old Kingdom (c. 2686 BC–c. 2181 BC) together with his spouse Amaunet. Amun and Amaunet are mentioned in the Old Egyptian pyramid texts. [4] Amun and Amaunet formed one quarter of the ancient Ogdoad of Hermopolis, representing the primordial concept or element of ...

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Thoth

The Place of Thoth in the Egyptian Mythology Thoth (from Greek Θώθ thṓth, from Egyptian ḏḥwty)  was considered one of the more important deities of the Egyptian pantheon. In art, he was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis or a baboon, animals sacred to him. His feminine counterpart was Seshat.[1] Thoth played many vital and prominent roles in Egyptian mythology, such as maintaining the universe, and being one of the two deities (the other being Ma’at, ...

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